Enduring Questions & Ideas (Q&I)

Undergraduate General Education

Concordia is among a distinctive group of universities that offer a coherent liberal arts curriculum for all of its students. Rather than asking you to cobble together a meaningful general education experience from a vast array of disconnected distribution courses, our signature curriculum Enduring Questions & Ideas (Q&I, for short) is carefully crafted so that you discover the purpose of a liberal arts education - to grow intellectually, ethically, and spiritually. Through Q&I Core and Exploration courses, all Concordia students engage in an academic experience that provides a foundation for further learning and for life.

Concordia University Irvine is the home of the Association for Core Texts and Courses’ Liberal Arts Institute. This prestigious institute—composed of 11 universities that include Columbia, St. John’s, Pepperdine, and New York University—is committed to the preservation and promotion of “the integrated and common study of world classics and texts of major cultural significance.”

In a recent survey of core liberal arts curricula at over 1,000 universities, the American Council of Trustees and Alumni rated just 24 colleges higher than Concordia. Concordia received a higher rating than numerous elite private and public universities like Harvard, Westmont, and the University of California—Irvine.

Q&I Core Courses

Q&I Core is comprised of classic liberal arts courses offered in small, innovative learning communities. Q&I Core courses are taken together in linked pairs: biology with theology, mathematics with philosophy, and history with literature. For transfer students, we offer a unique pair: philosophy with theology. Q&I Core classes typically have just 25 students, giving you a close-knit learning community.

Concordia's Q&I Core classes are mostly taught by full-time professors. Interaction with the professors is not limited to the classroom setting either. You are encouraged to meet with your professors during office hours. In fact, Q&I Core classes typically offer tutorials where you meet with your professors individually to discuss your papers and develop your ideas.

What are Truth, Goodness, & Beauty?

Philosophers and mathematicians in ancient Greece found themselves wondering about some of the same questions. “What is truth?” How can I identify something that is certain, valid, and complete, and must I cultivate certain virtues to find it? “What is beauty?” What are the objective attributes that identify beauty and why do some objects look beautiful while others do not? “What is good?” What and where is goodness in the world, and why should I pursue it? The Core Mathematics 101 and Core Philosophy 101 courses engage students in these same questions by examining great works and ideas. Students will come to see the individual and social significance of these questions in our own day, and they will be challenged to read carefully, think rigorously, and write well in order to develop reasoned answers to them.

  • Freshman Year
  • CPHI 101: Introduction to Philosophy
  • 3
This course will explore the study and practice of rational inquiry into fundamental questions about human wisdom, action, and creativity through the study of the traditions of Western philosophy through classic texts. Co-requisite: CMTH 101; permission from Academic Advising is needed to take CPHI 101 as an unlinked course.
  • CMTH 101: The Nature of Mathematics
  • 3
This course will guide students to gain knowledge about the nature of mathematics and develop their analytical reasoning skills to solve problems through topics such as number theory, probability and statistics, infinity, Non-Euclidean geometry, and general problem solving strategies; additional topics selected in dialog with the philosophy course. The overriding goals of this course are to develop a better perspective of mathematics and discover the power of mathematical thinking. Writing and projects, as well as traditional methods of assessment, will be used. Prerequisite: Intermediate Algebra or equivalent; co-requisite: CPHI 101; permission from Academic Advising is needed to take CMTH 101 as an unlinked course.


What is Truth?

People have asked this question since they have been able to speak to one another. It confronts the intellectual struggles humans have had with the idea of reality. Answering simply that truth is “what is right or factual” or “what is not false” are often posited; but when answers such as this are thought about in any depth, they are found wanting. This is why we ask this question in Core Biology 101 and Core Theology 101. It helps students realize that, while the sciences and religion set forth strong claims about the objectivity of the truth, no claim to truth is absolutely neutral, objective, or without the influence of a culture or intellectual paradigm. We can change our minds. We can evaluate our cultures and paradigms. But this takes dedication to a broad and deep conversation across disciplines. The question “What Is Truth?” puts students on a path toward the realization that truth without culture is not possible in human society. It encourages us to critically evaluate our biases, and to challenge the idea that there is a completely neutral, secular vantage point from which an observer might investigate the world. Finally, it allows us to understand the truth of this life’s experiences in light of the Truth incarnate: the person of Jesus Christ.

  • Freshman Year
  • CBIO 101: Integrated Biology
  • 3
This interdisciplinary, topic-driven course will review relevant issues in biology (and other disciplines) as they relate to current times including biotechnology, protein synthesis, biodiversity, conservation, evolution, reproductive technology, etc. which are discussed using current scientific data and its relationship to current issues. This is a liberal arts science course and draws upon disciplines such as history, theology and philosophy. Lab time is included in the schedule. Co-requisite: CTHL 101; permission from Academic Advising is needed to take CBIO 101 as an unlinked course.
  • CTHL 101: Foundations of Christian Theology
  • 3
This course will study the source of Christian theology, namely the Holy Scriptures. Drawing upon the Scriptures as well as historical and doctrinal writings by Christian theologians, students will examine major teachings of the Christian faith with differing understandings of these teachings being explored and, when appropriate, enabling them to understand and articulate the basic tenets of Christianity. Co-requisite: CBIO 101; permission from Academic Advising is needed to take CTHL 101 as an unlinked course.


Who is a Virtuous Citizen?

All of education is arguably a training in citizenship, that is, learning how to negotiate the relationships between our person and the land we inhabit, between human experience and the divine, between our self and the institutions that shape our existence in family, state, and worship. In what ways am I obligated to my neighbor, my local community, my nation? What benefits ought I to expect in exchange for tribute, allegiance, or membership? And what about those on the margins or outside—can they participate in justice, or the other virtues we hold dear? The conversation about these questions in the ancient and medieval world shapes our thinking even today, as it rests on the foundation of virtues—not just abstract moral concepts, but discrete sources of honorable, considered action. The literary and historical record we encounter in Core English 201 and Core History 201 invites us to consider that meaning afresh in our pursuit of the wise, honorable, cultivated—indeed, the virtuous—citizen.

  • Sophomore Year
  • CENG 201: World Literature to the Renaissance
  • 3
This course will focus on critical thinking and research-based writing through comparative and interdisciplinary analysis. Alongside lectures and class discussion, the study of representative great works of Western and non-Western literature from Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance will emphasize the literary, cultural, and religious significance of these texts. Co-requisite: CHST 201; permission from Academic Advising is needed to take CENG 201 as an unlinked course.
  • CHST 201: The West and the World
  • 3
This course will study the emergence and expansion of the major political, cultural, social, and economic developments in the East and the West from the dawn of Western civilization to the early modern era through the reading of significant texts and research-based writing, alongside lectures and class discussion. Co-requisite: CENG 201; permission from Academic Advising is needed to take CHST 201 as an unlinked course.


What is Freedom?

Freedom is difficult to define. In fact, it is usually defined negatively, that is, by the absence of certain things like coercion, slavery, imprisonment, and tyranny. And as difficult as it is to define, freedom is even more challenging to implement. It is always conditional and limited because it can actually conflict with other features of a good society, such as security, order, justice, or equality. At what point, then, do the conditions and limitations on freedom actually destroy it? To what extent should we sacrifice other good features like security or equality for the sake of freedom? The Core English 301 and Core History 301 courses seek to make sense of the modern world by engaging with great works of literature and political philosophy from the last four centuries as they grapple with these and other problems posed by the quest for freedom.

  • Junior Year
  • CENG 202 : World Literature from the Enlightenment
  • 3
This course will focus on critical thinking and research-based writing through comparative and interdisciplinary analysis. Alongside lectures and class discussions, the study of representative great works of Western and non-Western literature from the 17th century to the present will emphasize the literary, cultural, and religious significance of these texts. Co-requisite: CHST 202; permission from Academic Advising is needed to take CENG 202 as an unlinked course.
  • CHST 202 America and the World
  • 3
This course will look at the political, cultural, social, and economic developments in America and the world from the rise of the modern nation/state to the modern age through the reading of significant texts and research-based writing, alongside lectures and class discussion. Co-requisite: CENG 202; permission from Academic Advising is needed to take CHST 202 as an unlinked course.

Q&I Core Courses for Transfer Students

A unique pairing of philosophy and theology Core courses has been designed for students transferring with 30 or more semester units. They will explore the question of what it means to be human. Students transferring with fewer than 60 semester units will also choose between a set of Core history and literature courses.

What Does It Mean to be Human?

What is the common human condition? Can a human being know anything about God with certainty? Do we have souls? How about free will? What does it mean for a human being to be the object of redemption by an infinitely merciful Savior? How should a human being live and why? Which virtues, if any, are important in human life? Answers to these and similar questions have enormous consequences for individuals and society. Core Theology 200 and Core Philosophy 200 help students develop reasoned answers to questions such as these by engaging the Scriptures and classic texts to examine what it means to be human.

  • Required Courses for All Transfer Students
  • CPHI 200: Introduction to Philosophical Inquiry
  • 3
This course will explore the study and practice of rational inquiry into fundamental questions about human wisdom, action, and creativity as students learn the elements of rational inquiry through the study of the traditions of western philosophy through classic texts. Co-requisite: CThl 200; written permission from Academic Advising is needed to take CPHI 200 as an unlinked course.
  • CTHL 200: Introduction to Theological Thought
  • 3
This course will study the source of Christian theology, namely the Holy Scriptures by drawing upon them as well as historical and doctrinal writings by Christian theologians as students examine major teachings of the Christian faith enabling them to understand and articulate the basic tenets of Christianity. Co-requisites: CPhi 200; written permission from Academic Advising is needed to take CTHL 200 as an unlinked course.

Sophomore Transfer Q&I Core

Students entering with 30-59 semester units

  • Choose one of the following course pairings:
  • Who is a Virtuous Citizen?
  • CENG 201: World Literature to the Renaissance
  • 3
This course will focus on critical thinking and research-based writing through comparative and interdisciplinary analysis. Alongside lectures and class discussion, the study of representative great works of Western and non-Western literature from Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance will emphasize the literary, cultural, and religious significance of these texts. Co-requisite: CHST 201; permission from Academic Advising is needed to take CENG 201 as an unlinked course.
  • CHST 201: The West and the World
  • 3
This course will study the emergence and expansion of the major political, cultural, social, and economic developments in the East and the West from the dawn of Western civilization to the early modern era through the reading of significant texts and research-based writing, alongside lectures and class discussion. Co-requisite: CENG 201; permission from Academic Advising is needed to take CHST 201 as an unlinked course.
  • What is Freedom?
  • CENG 202: World Literature from the Enlightenment
  • 3
This course will focus on critical thinking and research-based writing through comparative and interdisciplinary analysis. Alongside lectures and class discussions, the study of representative great works of Western and non-Western literature from the 17th century to the present will emphasize the literary, cultural, and religious significance of these texts. Co-requisite: CHST 202; permission from Academic Advising is needed to take CENG 202 as an unlinked course.
  • CHST 202: America and the World
  • 3
This course will look at the political, cultural, social, and economic developments in America and the world from the rise of the modern nation/state to the modern age through the reading of significant texts and research-based writing, alongside lectures and class discussion. Co-requisite: CENG 202; permission from Academic Advising is needed to take CHST 202 as an unlinked course.

Q&I Exploration Courses

Concordia’s Q&I Exploration courses build on Q&I Core. You will explore more big questions in disciplines like economics, exercise and sport science, astronomy, chemistry, music, creative writing, anthropology, and psychology.

Throughout Q&I, you will wrestle with life's foundational questions and ideas. You will be challenged to read great works closely, think critically and creatively about problems, communicate your ideas effectively in writing and speech, and make meaningful connections between academic disciplines, the Christian faith, and life. By developing your knowledge and strengthening your intellectual habits, you will become broadly prepared for life and further studies. You will develop into a wise, honorable, and cultivated citizen who can tackle life's challenges and use your gifts to serve society and the church.

What Are My Vocations?

Why am I here? What is my purpose? What should I do with my life? Questions like these are asked by people at every stage of life. The biblical teaching of vocation provides a rich and practical way to address these questions. In creation and redemption, God calls people to multiple roles in life and works through them to love their neighbors and nature. Because each calling is unique to a specific context, people must think carefully about their callings to fulfill them virtuously for the benefit of others. In INT 100 students will examine their vocations in life based on the Bible and common virtues. Students will explore what roles they have now, what their gifts are, and how they might be called to serve others later. They will also engage in virtuous service.

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  • Required Course
  • 2 Units
  • INT 100: Foundations: Exploring Virtue and Vocation
  • 2
This course is designed to help students successfully prepare for the rigors of Concordia University Irvine. Students will learn skills to promote academic, social, and emotional success during their time in college. Students will analyze virtuous living and learn how to step in and appropriately take care of the needs of their neighbor. Students will explore their numerous vocations as they increase their critical thinking, sharpen their academic skills, and identify resources that will help them develop into wise, honorable, and cultivated citizens. Requirement: students entering with fewer than twenty-four (24) semester units of college credit are required to take this course.

“Who Do You Say That I Am?”

The biggest questions that people ask are spiritual questions. Who am I? Is this all that there is? Where did I come from? Where am I going? Is there such a thing as truth? Are all religions the same? Is God knowable? How can we know (about) God? Jesus asked his disciples the most important question: “Who do you say that I am?” (Mark 8:29). This question about Jesus—and all he taught, did, claimed to be, and the impact he had/has on life—still echoes in our ears expecting an answer. Courses that explore this critical question (and others related to it) examine God's self-revelation, and consider people's reception of it and their response to it.

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  • Choose 2 of the following courses:
  • 6 Units
  • THL 105: Life of Christ
  • 3
This course provides an introduction to Christianity through the life and work of Christ. It begins with the study of Jesus in the Gospels and then moves into the rest of Scripture. The theological, historical, and cultural background and significance of Christ will be examined. The unity and reliability of Scripture will also be addressed. This course is designed primarily for the student who has had little or no contact with Western culture, and no formal education or exposure to Christian doctrine and practice. Departmental approval is required to register for this course.
  • THL 201: History and Literature of the Old Testament
  • 3
This course will investigate the literature of the Old Testament in light of its cultural and canonical contexts with an emphasis on its major theological questions and themes and their relevance for Christian faith and life.
  • THL 202: History and Literature of the New Testament
  • 3
Through a historical and literary survey of the New Testament, this course will emphasize theological themes and their relevance for Christian faith and life.
  • THL 311: Old Testament Book of the Bible
  • 3
This course will offer an in-depth study of a single book of the Old Testament or several books in their entirety which will vary from offering to offering and be selected by the instructor. Prerequisite: THL 201 or consent of instructor. This course may be repeated for credit if a different book is studied.
  • THL 312: New Testament Book of the Bible
  • 3
This course will offer an in-depth study of a single book of the New Testament or several smaller books in their entirety which will vary from offering to offering and be selected by the instructor. Prerequisites: THL 201 and THL 202 or consent of instructor. This course may be repeated for credit if a different book is studied.

How Shall I Live?

How shall I live well? Health can be defined as a state of being indicating signs and symptoms of disease or lack of disease. As such there is an emphasis on lifestyle and lifestyle changes to promote optimal health and longevity. Wellness, however, can be seen as a system of living oriented toward maximizing potential with a focus on self-responsibility. In this approach, one can be intellectually well but physically unwell; one can be socially well but spiritually unwell. These dimensions are not either/or dichotomies as each dimension is a continuum. The emphasis here is viewing the person—or, by extension, the community—as a whole and not only as a body of systems. Courses that explore this question address wellness from multiple dimensions such as spiritual, vocational, physical, emotional, ethical, political, social, and economic wellness.

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  • Choose 1 of the following courses:
  • 3 Units
  • DAN 145: Dance for Health
  • 3
Dance for health is an activity-based course that surveys physical, mental, spiritual, emotional and social aspects of health which can be achieved through dance as a healthy lifestyle habit. Students will explore published research, participate in weekly social dance class and conduct a collaborative service learning project. Learning social dance integrates physical, mental, social and emotional wellness. Students will also investigate how spiritual wellness can be addressed through dance. Creating a social community environment where the student will teach others dances they have learned will deepen the concepts students have explored throughout the course. The collaborative nature of the project will further advance the social wellness aspect of the course.
  • ESS 105: Christian Wellness
  • 3
A foundational exploration into Christ-centered wellness and how to construct a comprehensive strategy to develop and maintain personal wellness in relationship with God.
  • ESS 320: Historical, Social, Cultural Foundations of Sport and P.E.
  • 3
This course will present and discuss the historical, sociological, and philosophical analyses of sport and physical education, including current challenges, relevant issues, controversies, and career opportunities in sport and physical education.
  • INT 105: Leadership Development
  • 3
This class is designed to be an interactive exploration of personal and team leadership development. Throughout this course, students will be challenged to look at their leadership and followership style and skill set to serve at Concordia University and in their future. This course equips students with the fundamental leadership skills - intellectual, vocational, ethical, social, and spiritual - they need to foster wellness within themselves, others, and the groups and communities that they serve.
  • PHI 467: Bioethics and Healthcare Professions
  • 3
This course will examine the ethical issues raised by modern advances in health care and biological research. Attention will be given to the language of bioethics, important philosophical and theological approaches, and socio-cultural implications. Special foci may include clinical nursing ethics, business ethics in a healthcare context, or other topics as appropriate. Prerequisite: CTHL 101, CTHL 200 or THL 202 (or equivalent).
  • POL 321: Political Thought I: Ancient to Early Modern
  • 3
This course will analyze the nuances and trace the development of Western political thought from classical Greece to 17th century northern Europe with attention given to the questions facing every generation concerning the nature of political association and the good society. Students will become familiar with each major political thinker, the context in which they wrote, and influence upon the history of ideas.
  • POL 322: Political Thought II: The Enlightenment
  • 3
This course will analyze the nuances and trace the development of Western political thought from the early Enlightenment (17th century) to the present with attention given to the questions facing every generation concerning the nature of political association and the good society. Students will become familiar with each major political thinker, the context in which they wrote, and their influence upon the history of ideas.
  • PSY 331: Marriage and the Family
  • 3
Using a Christian approach to marriage, this course will study the family and its intimate environment including a discussion of courtship and role relationships within the family as a social institution. An emphasis will be placed on the changing nature of the family, family problems, and family strengths.
  • THL 465: Christians and Ethics
  • 3
Through an exploration of morality and ethics in light of what Scripture teaches, this course will orient students to the main approaches, both traditional and contemporary, of non-biblical philosophical ethics as they learn how the Christian faith interacts with these approaches. The significance of the Lutheran confessional distinction between God's left and right hand rule will also be explored. Student research and presentations on contemporary ethical issues are usually included. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing or consent of instructor, CTHL 101 or CTHL 200.

Why Art?

The Arts—visual art, theatre, music, and others—have several purposes. Art can entertain, be profane, or be profound. Art can also move people to significant historical actions, to personal peace or angst, or to community or conflict. A cultivated citizen is capable of engaging with various art forms to reflect and to affect society, an inner sense of being, personal relations, and faith expressions. Courses that explore Art engage students with the Arts and pursue questions such as: What is art? How is art good or useful? What role does art play in shaping and/or reflecting culture? What role does our aesthetic response play in understanding art? How do creativity and the creative process relate to your vocation(s)? How does a Christian responsibly experience or participate in art? How does the beauty and ugliness of art help us to understand God’s Law and Gospel?

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  • Choose 1 of the following courses:
  • 3 Units
  • ART 111: Experiences in Art
  • 3
This course will introduce students to the different components resulting in a finished work of art. Emphasis will be placed on experimentation with media and techniques used by professional artists during their progression from idea to finished product. Students will be given presentations in digital media that will serve as guidance for the class projects.
  • ART 311: Art History I
  • 3
This is a survey course of Western art from the Prehistoric Period through the Renaissance, employing illustrated lectures, independent research, museum visits, and discussion. Offered alternate years.
  • ART 312: Art History II
  • 3
This course is a survey of Western art from the Renaissance through the present employing illustrated lectures, independent research, museum visits and discussion. Offered alternate years.
  • ART 315: The History of Contemporary Art
  • 3
This course will examine the art of the last half of the 20th and 21st centuries as it explores the ideas that became seminal points of interest for contemporary artists during this period. Students will study how art reflects history; how style communicates the concerns of the artist and their culture; and how symbols, techniques, materials, and subjects are used to convey the issues important to contemporary artists. Offered alternate years.
  • MUS 102: Music Fundamentals
  • 3
Through integrated reading, listening, discussion, musical participation, and concert attendance students will identify, experience, and understand the elements of music and basic notation and will apply active listening skills to the study of global and Western music from the Middle Ages to the present day in this course. A class fee is required to cover the cost of concert attendance.
  • MUS 111: Experiences in Music
  • 3
This course will analyze the nuances and trace the development of Western political thought from classical Greece to 17th century northern Europe with attention given to the questions facing every generation concerning the nature of political association and the good society. Students will become familiar with each major political thinker, the context in which they wrote, and influence upon the history of ideas.
  • MUS 112: Music in the Liberal Arts
  • 3
Through integrated reading, multimedia presentations, listening, writing, and concert attendance, students will engage with music in this online course in the context of history, style, literature, science, faith, sociology, and philosophy. A class fee is required to cover the cost of concert attendance.
  • MUS 331: Music History: Antiquity through Bach
  • 3
This survey course will examine the development of Western art music in Western history from ancient Greece antiquity to the time of J.S. Bach including the relationship between secular and ecclesiastical music, vocal and instrumental music, and the trends, genres, and composer; questions of social function; and the relationship between secular and ecclesiastical of music. Prerequisite: MUS 202 or consent of instructor approval. Offered alternate years.
  • THR 111: Experiences in Theatre
  • 3
This activity-oriented course is designed to acquaint students with the ephemeral and experiential nature of the theatre including play-going, play-making (i.e., scene work), rudimentary play analysis, discussion, and direct participation in on-campus productions.
  • THR 251: Introduction to Theatre
  • 3
This course will provide an overview of the various conventions, forms, styles, and genres of the theatre, including principles of play analysis and exploration of theatre criticism from dramaturgical, literary, and cultural perspectives through the thematic discussions of representative plays. There may be an additional charge for required field trips.
  • WRT 323: Introduction to Genre and Craft in Creative Writing
  • 3
As a multi-genre introduction to the craft of creative writing, this course will examine literary conventions as well as the writing techniques and tools essential to effective writing and editing. Prerequisite: WRT 102 or WRT 201 or equivalent.

What Is Eloquence?

Eloquence can be defined as speaking and writing well, or moving another's soul toward good by sharing the truth in love. An eloquent person thinks critically and articulates thoughts clearly in order to effectively participate in society. To accomplish this, what oral and written delivery techniques—such as language, tone and organization—should be utilized to engage and enhance the presentation to the intended audience? How should logos, pathos and ethos be used to influence the audience? Courses that address eloquence deal with its definitions and purposes, and develop students as eloquent speakers or writers through repeated practice.

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  • Required Courses
  • 6 Units
  • COM 111: Public Speaking
    -or-
    COM 211: Introduction to Argumentation and Debate
  • 3
COM 111: This course will examine the principles and practice of effective oral communication and the analysis of the speaking-listening process with an emphasis on informative and persuasive speaking experiences.

-or-

COM 211: As a performance-based course, students will learn argument design, use of reason and evidence, and practice in a competitive academic debate setting with a focus on critical thinking, research skills, and the oral expression of arguments with rhetorical and presentational power.
  • WRT 102: Writing and Research
    -or-
    WRT 201: The Art of the Essay
  • 3
WRT 102: In this course students will practice research methods and a variety of writing strategies such as narration, description, exposition, argumentation, and develop skills as critical thinkers, readers, and writers through research, reading, writing, and writer workshops.

-or-

WRT 201: In this course students will explore the aesthetic range of the essay by reading selected works from a variety of authors examining them not only as objects for analysis, but also as models for stylistic experiments as students practice the art of the essay. Freshman placement by SAT or ACT scores.

How Do I Understand Nature?

Modern society uses the natural sciences to make sense of the universe, understand how it operates, and help us understand our place in it. A “wise, honorable, and cultivated citizen” needs to be aware of worldview and how it affects one’s view of the natural (and the supernatural) world. To ponder all that is real, one must ask and answer hard questions that continue to vex us, questions such as: What is truth? What is science? How do faith and science relate? Can I know the reality of God like the reality of the atom? How should humanity interact with nature? Courses that explore these (and other related) questions will help students know why they believe what they know about nature and how to articulate their thoughts in an educated manner.

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  • Choose 1 of the following courses:
  • 4 Units
  • CHE 101: Introduction to Chemistry
  • 4
This course will cover the systematic exploration of basic chemical principles including matter, atoms, ions, moles, molecular and iconic compounds, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, and solutions. Scientific method and epistemology in the context of the interface between the Christian faith and the chemical sciences will be introduced and developed. A lab fee is required. Lab time is included in the schedule.
  • CHE 221: Chemistry I
  • 4
A systematic exploration of fundamental chemical principles including matter, energy, electromagnetic radiation, atomic structure, periodicity, stoichiometry, chemical bonding, and structure will be examined in this course, including the introduction to the scientific method and epistemology in the context of the interface between the Christian faith and the chemical sciences. Lab time is included in the schedule. A lab fee is required. Prerequisite: CHE 101 or consent of department chair.
  • PHY 211: Physics I
  • 4
This introductory course will emphasize classical mechanics, wave motion, and thermodynamics. Lab time is included in the schedule. A lab fee is required. Prerequisite: consent of division chair.
  • PHY 221: Calculus-based Physics I
  • 4
This course will study Newtonian mechanics: vectors and scalars, kinematics and dynamics of translational and rotational motion, Newton's laws, speed, velocity, acceleration, force, torque, work, energy, linear and angular momentum, wave and harmonic motion, gravitation, friction, conservation of energy and momentum, thermodynamics. A lab fee is required. Pre-requisite: MTH 271 (concurrent enrollment allowed) or consent of instructor.
  • PHY 231: Astronomy I
  • 4
This course will provide a comprehensive introduction to planetary astronomy with a brief exposure to stellar astronomy including the solar system, sun, planets, moons, asteroids, comets, meteors, meteorites, stars, galaxies, origins of the universe, telescopes, spectra, and space exploration.
  • PHY 232 Astronomy II
  • 4
This course will provide a comprehensive introduction to stellar astronomy and cosmology including star and galaxy formation, origins of the universe, black holes, dark matter, and dark energy. Lab time is included in the schedule.
  • SCI 115: Physical Science
  • 4
Integrated, interdisciplinary introduction to chemistry, central science, and physics, the fundamental science, emphasizing key concepts, significant chemical and physical phenomena and practical applications together with a brief introduction to the historical, philosophical, epistemological and theological underpinnings of chemistry and physics in current Christian apologetic context. Prerequisite: CMTH 101, MTH 201, MTH 211, MTH 251 or higher or concurrent registration. A lab fee is required.
  • SCI 118: Physical Oceanography
  • 4
This course will provide an introduction to the physical sciences in the context of physical oceanography along with the basic concepts of physics and chemistry including properties of water, ocean currents, heat budget, nutrient cycling, ocean-atmosphere interaction, El Ni#o-Southern Oscillation, oceanic waves, and tidal cycles. Lab time is included in the schedule along with field trips during lab time and up to two (2) weekend field trips. This course fulfills Q&I general education. Offered alternate years (odd years, fall semester).

Who Am I and Who Are They?

The exploration of this question analyzes the complex, dynamic interplay between self and other. Living in a good society requires citizens to be “wise, honorable, and cultivated” by closely examining how individuals think about, construct, act upon, and relate to one another. Courses that explore this question concentrate on the dialectic between “self” and “other” underscoring the various historical, economic, political, cultural, and social forces that shape both “I” and “they,” as well as the tensions that exist between the two.

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  • Choose 1 of the following courses:
  • 3 Units
  • ANT 210: Cultural Anthropology
  • 3
Understanding diverse cultures of the world, from preliterate societies to modern technological societies, is the focus of this course, and will include mankind's universal as well as adaptive dimensions; and the examination of socioeconomic, political, religious, and physical environmental factors that relate to the values and lifestyles of various peoples.
  • ANT 314: Native Peoples of North America
  • 3
An anthropological overview of native North American societies from pre- Columbian times to the present will be the focus of this course, utilizing a culture area approach and including an emphasis on the native people of California. Offered alternate years.
  • COM 216: Interpersonal Communication
  • 3
This course will analyze person-to-person communicative behavior in contexts ranging from informal to organizational looking at topics such as attraction, trust, language, and nonverbal behavior.
  • COM 324: Intercultural Communication
  • 3
Social and cultural variables in speech communication processes and strategies for resolving communication problems in intercultural settings with an emphasis on variables such as perception, roles, language codes, and nonverbal communication will be examined in this course.
  • ECO 201: Macroeconomics
  • 3
This course will survey the scope and methods of the study of economics; the principles underlying the production, exchange, distribution and consumption of wealth along with various economic problems. The systematic investigation of the market structure of American capitalism, encompassing the production and distribution of income, welfare economics and current domestic problems.
  • ECO 202: Microeconomics
  • 3
This introductory course will look at specific aspects of the economy such as households, firms, and markets, including the investigation of supply and demand in the product market, the perfectly competitive market, monopoly and imperfect competition, and the role of government in private economy. Emphasis will be given to economic challenges of the future.
  • ECO 221: History of Economic Thought
  • 3
This is a survey course of the history of economic thought from 1600 to 2000, focusing on primary works and discussion of their historical context. Major authors covered will include Smith, Marx, Marshall, and Keynes. Specific policy areas surveyed include internal improvements, money and banking, tariffs, trade, antitrust, and regulation. Recommended prerequisite: ECO 201.
  • ENG 382: Postcolonial Literature
  • 3
This course will provide an in-depth study of postcolonial theory and literature from South Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean with readings and discussions focusing on postcolonial theory, common themes, literary technique, the role of religion, and the question of personal and national identity. Prerequisite: Eng 201 or CEng 201 or CEng 202. Offered alternate years.
  • PSY 101: Introduction to Psychology
  • 3
Concepts and principles pertinent to psychological processes of social behavior, development, motivation, sensation, perception, cognition and memory, learning, personality, psychological disorders and their treatment, as well as the biological perspective will be examined in this course.
  • SOC 101: Introduction to Sociology
  • 3
This course will analyze the topics of socialization; social interaction, relationships, deviance, control, institutions, processes, and change; family and educational problems; child abuse; crime and delinquency; and drug, alcohol, and tobacco abuse.
  • REL 321: World Religions
  • 3
This survey course of the world's major non-Christian religions will include motifs, belief patterns, ritual and worship, ethics and social patterns, origin and development, and sacred writings.
Concordia's Q&I Core is rich in both educational traditions of the West and new explorations of the traditions of the wider world. Concordia's Q&I Core provides both disciplinary and interdisciplinary means of education, grounded in the Western, secular and Judeo-Christian, intellectual and spiritual developments, that will allow students to reach out from the West to works, faiths, and traditions around the world. The Q&I Core courses are remindful of the great courses in Literature, Humanities and Civilization that have been offered to students at some of the finest universities in the land.

- J. Scott Lee, Executive Director of the Association for Core Texts and Courses

Why Q&I?

We believe Q&I is among the most distinctive undergraduate curriculums in the nation. Recent data from our students and alumni shows the impact it's having – in the classroom and the workplace.

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Q&I Resources

Q&I Core Peer Tutors

Concordia's Q&I Core Tutoring Center has dozens of peers who have excelled in these courses and want to help you excel, too. Tutors can help you with your readings, papers, assignments, and study skills. Tutoring is free of charge.

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Q&I Forum

Go deep. The forum discusses great works (text, art, speech, theorem, etc.) and the crucial questions and ideas about life that they address. The forum also deals with related issues, such as core curricula, pedagogy, and cultivating sound habits of mind and virtues.

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