Applied Music Program

Music Department

A guide to taking lessons at Concordia University Irvine.

Tuition and Other Costs

  • All private lessons, designated in the catalog as “PL:” at the 101, 201, 301, or 401 level, are assessed a tuition surcharge. The tuition surcharge is expressed in the Concordia catalog ($590 per unit, but students enrolled in an ensemble receive a preferential tuition surcharge structure - please see below).
  • All applied classes, titled “___ Class” at the 100 level, do not incur a tuition surcharge unless students are taking an overload for the semester (more than 18 units).

2018-2019 Applied Music courses that are private lessons will incur the following tuition charges:
Students who are not also enrolled in a university ensemble:
$590 per unit (the tuition fee posted in the Catalog)

Students who are enrolled in a university ensemble:

  • $90 for the first unit taken each semester in support of your ensemble responsibility (for example, for trumpet lessons if you play in orchestra) and/or for the first unit of organ lessons taken each semester.
  • $285 per unit taken in an area external to ensembles in which you participate (for example, piano lessons if you play trumpet in orchestra) or as a second unit of any registered private lesson.
  • No additional incursion of the university's overload tuition charge if these units cause you to have more than 18 total units in a semester.
  • If, after Census Date, you drop out of lessons, miss 3 lessons unexcused, or drop your participation in an ensemble, you will be charged the full tuition fee for applied music as posted in the tuition/fees section of the catalog ($590).

Other Costs: Just as students need to purchase textbooks for any college class, there also is an expectation that students purchase learning materials to support the lessons: sheet music and technique books. They also must keep their instrument in healthy working condition, which requires additional cost (reeds, valve oil, water bottle, organ shoes, etc.).

Definition

“Applied music” (also known as private study) is the system in which students develop musical abilities on a specific (applied) instrument, voice, or composition. Most of the applied music program is based in private lessons with an expert teacher (a tuition surcharge applies), although some classroom-style group instruction is also offered (no tuition surcharge unless it is taken as an overload).

Role

Applied study is one of the three main areas in Concordia’s music program, which is comprised of:

  • Ensemble and chamber music performance
  • Applied Music study
  • Academic courses in music

Music ensembles serve the purpose of student and audience enrichment and university outreach and ministry. Most students enrolled in musical ensembles are expected to develop performance skills on at least one instrument or voice through applied study. Music majors and minors are required to complete academic coursework in music, although any Concordia student is welcome to enroll in these courses.

Forms/Documents

The following applied music forms are available in the Music Office, or online via the Music Student Forms page:

Coaching/Accompanist Policies:

Juries:

Recitals:

Other

Music Community

Music majors and non-music majors are a part of the community of developing musicians at Concordia. All are expected to:

  • Participate in studio activities such as studio class, masterclasses and special events (all students who study with a given teacher are considered members of that studio)
  • Be supportive and attentive audience members at noon recitals, honors recitals, guest/faculty artist recitals, and junior/senior recitals. Each studio has recital/concert attendance requirements. All applied students are required to attend the honors recital during finals week of each semester.
  • Cooperatively support the development of other applied students and seek out their assistance, particularly those in the same studio.

Please consult your studio for specific requirements as a member of our music community.

Applied Classes

Students may register for applied classes in organ, piano, voice, and guitar. There is no additional registration fee to take these classes, which offer introductory training at the 100 level (note: the 100 level is designated for applied classes, and 101-401 is designated for applied private lessons).

Private Studies

Private lessons on instruments listed below are available (an additional registration fee applies):

  • Voice: Several instructors teach voice. Students will be matched with an appropriate instructor.
  • Orchestral Instruments: Standard instruments in the brass, woodwind, concert percussion, and string families.
  • Keyboard: Organ, Piano, Keyboard Improvisation (for students interested in worship piano, jazz, organ improvisation, or harpsichord)
  • Other areas: Handbells, Guitar, Electric Bass, Drumset, Composition

Units (Credits)

  • All applied classes receive one unit of credit.
  • Private lessons may be registered for one or two units. A one-unit lesson will typically consist of either fourteen 30-minute lessons or ten 45-minute lessons over the course of a semester. A two-unit lesson will typically consist of fourteen 60-minute lessons.
  • Private lessons incur a tuition surcharge for each unit of study. Classes do not incur a registration fee.

Registration

In order to register for an applied music lesson or class, students should follow normal registration procedures set by Concordia for normal courses. Please note that each level of private lessons offers two options. For example, 101-1 and 201-1 are offered as one unit. 101-2 and 201-2 are offered as 2 units.

Piano Competency

All music majors must pass the music department Piano Competency Examination. Registration for the first attempt must be made by the fourth semester prior to graduation (normally the first semester of junior year). In order to prepare for the test, students may independently prepare the required music, but are encouraged to enroll in piano class or private studies to prepare. All music majors must register for MUKP 211 Piano Competency, a zero-credit course, during the semester in which they plan to take the examination. The examination will normally be scheduled during juries. When registered, the student will be assessed a $25 examination fee. If the student does not pass, the student must register again for MUKP 211. Piano Competency guidelines are available in the Music Office. All students preparing for the exam should be aware of the latest requirements well in advance of their test.

Voice Competency

All music majors must attain voice competency by enrolling in (A)voice class for one semester, (B) private voice lessons for one semester, or (C) a university choir for two consecutive semesters.

Accompanist/Coaching

Concordia expects most applied students to collaborate with an accompanist/coach as a component of preparing a solo for jury or public performance. Students should sign up for multiple coaching sessions throughout the semester. Coaching sessions are scheduled in 15 minute increments and sign up sheets are available on the door of the accompanist’s studio. Collaboration with an accompanist should take place early in the process of learning a solo and should continue throughout the semester until final preparations. Voice and instrument studios have different guidelines - please consult them for specifics. Note: Coaching session reservations with Dr. Ehring are to be made online.

Juries

A jury is the final exam for a private lesson where individual students perform for a jury of faculty (typically consisting of their private instructor, the lead professor in the applied area, and maybe additional faculty). Each area (instrumental, vocal, handbell, keyboard, etc.) establishes standards for what needs to be performed at juries. Typically, an accompanied solo/movement is required and some additional technical studies, etudes, or sight reading might also be required. The use of an accompanist is required if the solo includes part for accompanist (usually piano). All students must thoroughly complete the Jury Information Form by the deadline provided by the department.
Please consult your studio for specific jury preparation and performance requirements.

Promotion

The promotion system is built on students engaging in deliberate, self-regulatory individual practice for a minimum of 3 hours per week in a process to successfully complete assignments given in each studio (each area has different requirements). Enrollment at levels 201-401 is contingent on promotion during a music jury. Music majors must complete one semester at the 401 level in order to graduate. Music minors must complete at least two semesters at the 201 level. The final decision for promotion rests on the full-time faculty member that directs the area of study, based on a recommendation from the private instructor.

Levels

101:

Goal: To establish the fundamentals of instrument or voice technique and musicianship to a level that contributes positively to ensemble playing. This is achieved through instrument-specific learning outcomes similar to the following:

  • Intonation management: The student is able to alter the intonation of notes.
  • Musical expression: The student performs a solo with noticeable expressive elements that fit the norms of musical style.
  • Technique: The student demonstrates fundamental instrument/voice technique as specified in the syllabus.
  • Music reading: The student is able to successfully play through a one-minute intermediate level etude without pedagogical assistance from the private instructor and one week of preparation time.

Note: All new students will be enrolled in this level in their first semester of study. Transfers may petition to enroll at a higher level.

Standards for promotion to from 101 to 201:

  • The student completes a jury in which the adjudicating faculty determines the following: The student has established the basic fundamentals to assert a significant musical contribution in a college music ensemble. This includes intonation management, expression, instrument or voice technique, and music reading.
  • Some more advanced musicians might be retained at the 101 level due to a need to make major technique changes, or reading or intonation skills might need additional fundamental work. This is a normal part of the development process, but it is important for students to know why they need to continue at the 101 level.
  • Student has completed one solo public performance in a noon recital or other approved performance (usually with an accompanist). The performance must be specified on the student’s jury form at the time of promotion and approved by faculty as a qualified solo performance.
  • Student adheres to basic tenets of professionalism, including collegiality, accepting constructive criticism, reasonably quick communication, notification of schedule conflicts, and promptness.

201:

Goal: To become a soloist capable of preparing solos (or movements/etudes) with a high level of technical execution and expression. This is achieved through further refinement of the 101-level learning outcomes as well as instrument-specific learning outcomes similar to the following:

  • Familiarity with great works - The student can identify 10 solo works on this instrument that are considered important repertoire that also would qualify for inclusion on a junior or senior recital.
  • Soloist experience - The student will perform a solo publicly at a noon recital

Notes:

  • Many non-music majors may be comfortable studying at this level for the duration of their semesters if their goal is to be an effective ensemble member.
  • For majors and non-majors interested in advanced collegiate musical achievement, this is a transitional level. These students should aspire to develop 301 level skills as soon as possible.

Standards for promotion to 301:

  • The student has completed a jury in which the adjudicating faculty determine that the student achieved the technical, expressive, and reading skills that are necessary in order to prepare advanced collegiate repertoire.
  • The student has completed two approved solo public performances in a noon recital or other performance. Both performances must be specified on the student’s jury form at the time of promotion and approved by faculty.
  • Student adheres to basic tenets of professionalism, including collegiality, accepting constructive criticism, reasonably quick communication, notification of schedule conflicts, and promptness.

301:

Goal: To successfully prepare collegiate-level recital repertoire for a junior recital and/or over several noon recitals. This is achieved through further refinement of the 101-201 learning outcomes specific to the student’s instrument, as well as successful public performance of a growing list of learned repertoire. This list of learned repertoire must be shared at each jury and approved by faculty, reflecting a growingly larger list each semester.

Note: All students at this level are advanced college musicians. Music majors with advanced performance skills might spend many semesters at this level.

Standards for promotion to 401:

  • The student is a seasoned, successfully-adjudicated soloist on advanced collegiate repertoire, having successfully completed (A) a junior recital, and if deemed necessary by faculty, a jury in which the faculty award promotion, or (B) at least four noon recital performances at the 301 level plus a jury in which the faculty award promotion.
  • Student adheres to basic tenets of professionalism, including collegiality, accepting constructive criticism, reasonably quick communication, notification of schedule conflicts, and promptness.

401:

Goal: To successfully prepare collegiate-level recital repertoire for a senior recital and/or during at least two noon recitals. This is achieved through public performances of advanced collegiate repertoire and

Notes:

  • This is the most advanced level of study at Concordia. Every music major must pass one semester of study at the 401 level in order to graduate.
  • There is no promotion opportunity during the 401 jury due to it being the highest level of study. The jury is for a grade only.
  • Some students may focus some of their efforts at this level to prepare for graduate school auditions.

Noon Recitals

Concordia’s Noon Recital Series exists to provide any applied student a venue to publicly perform music that has been prepared in lessons. Music majors are typically required to perform in noon recitals every semester in residence (usually twice). At the beginning of each semester, faculty will assign students to recital dates. Some recital dates will contain open slots for sign-ups. Students must clear their recital repertoire with their private instructor, prepare it collaboratively with an accompanist (when music includes an accompaniment), and provide accurate program information to the staff member who compiles the printed program.

Chapel Performances

Students are encouraged to prepare sacred music for use in chapel. Please consult Carol.McDaniel@cui.edu if you are interested in sharing music for chapel.

Junior Recitals

Students who have completed at least one semester at the 301 level of private study may apply to present a junior recital, which consists of 20-30 minutes of solo music. The junior recital is typically shared with another student. The junior recital application packet is available from the music office and must be completed in the semester prior to giving the junior recital. Approval is finalized at a jury. Students who are applying for a junior recital should sign up for two consecutive jury slots and present a “recital check” at the jury. Details about the recital check are available in the junior recital packet. For the junior recital, students will need to organize their assisting musicians and rehearsals, publicize the recital, prepare the program according to the Music Department’s Style Guide, organize all logistics, and set up light refreshments after the recital for the audience (not required, but this has become a tradition).

Senior Recitals

Students who have completed at least one semester at the 401 level of private study may apply to present a senior recital, which consists of 40-60 minutes of solo repertoire. The senior recital is not shared with another student soloist. The senior recital application packet is available from the music office and must be completed in the semester prior to giving the senior recital. Approval is finalized at a jury. Students who are applying for a senior recital should sign up for two consecutive jury slots and present a “recital check” at the jury. Details about the recital check are available in the senior recital packet. At the beginning of the semester of the senior recital, students must complete an independent study form that specifies the senior recital (available from the Registrar). For the senior recital, students will need to organize their assisting musicians and rehearsals, publicize the recital, prepare the program according to the Music Department Style Guide, organize all logistics, and set up light refreshments after the recital (not required, but this has become a tradition).

Music Major Graduation Requirements for Applied Study

Applied study (private lessons) is required each semester students are in residence. Music majors may enroll in one private lesson for up to 2 units per semester, and may also enroll in a secondary private lesson for no more than 1 unit per semester (3 total applied units per semester maximum). Each unit of study represents at least 3 hours of deliberate, self-regulated practice per week. Students must progress on a primary instrument from level 101 through successful completion of at least one semester at level 401. Students entering with 60 or more semester units may petition to begin applied study at the 301 level by completing an entrance jury in which students must demonstrate competence in performance of repertoire at the 201 level. Approval must be granted by the studio teacher and the director of the performance area before census date of the first semester of study.
In addition to private study, the following applied music requirements are also in effect:

  • Pass piano competency
  • Complete the voice competency requirement (one semester of voice lessons or voice class, or one year in a choir ensemble)
  • Complete a Senior Recital or a Senior Project

Music Minor Requirements for Applied Study

  • Four units of applied study, with at least two at the 201 level or higher.
  • Study at the 301-401 level is not required, but may be used toward music electives in the minor.
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