We Cannot Save the World, but We Can Live Out Our Vocation

August 02, 2019 - 1 minute read


What led you to Concordia University Irvine?

I was initially attracted to the small classroom atmosphere. I soon realized that Concordia University taught me how to develop my passion and apply my skills to help other people.

What influenced the choice of your major?

My family.

Which faculty or staff member do you most admire?

Dr. Schultz because he told me I could never save the world and challenged me to continue to grow, mature, and develop my skills. I will always honor and carry his teachings with me.

Where have you experienced growth as a student?

Sometimes when I look back to my student days, I cringe on my naiveness about anthropology. I now recognize that it is all part of the process. My senior year at CUI was when I began to mature, widen my perspective, and learn what it means to be selfless.

What sticks with you from Enduring Questions & Ideas?

What Dr. Schultz always used to say: "People are People." This simple quote can carry a lot of weight.

What do you consider your greatest achievement so far?

I am utilizing my educational background in Cultural Anthropology and Art to bring community members together and participate in grass-root action/change.

How do you define vocation?

To me, vocation is being able to apply my skills/training to help other people in a way that is inclusive, humbling, and incorporates what other people view as help. There is a distinction between saving and helping. I am not trying to save a culture or a community. Ethnographic methods can be very effective when working on a project that combats a history of colonialism, violence, and marginalization.

What would be your ideal job?

I would love to be able to work globally. Maybe start a non-profit? However, I need more training. I am currently about to start school at OHSU-PSU for a graduate certificate in Public Health. I am also applying for a Ph.D. program in Medical Anthropology.

Back to top