Pre-Physical Therapy and Allied Health | Exercise and Sport Science Major | Concordia University Irvine

Communication Studies

Pre-Physical Therapy and Allied Health Emphasis

School of Arts and Sciences

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Curriculum

The pre-physical therapy and allied health degree is designed for students who wish to pursue post-bachelorette studies in a Doctorate of physical therapy, occupational therapy, nursing, physician assistant or athletic training.

The ESS program helps you develop interpersonal and professional skills needed for client-patient interaction, assessment and evaluation of client patient needs and integration of this information into a rehabilitation or exercise program.

This degree will serve as a gateway degree to the allied health professions listed above or preparation for post-baccalaureate study in other areas such as exercise physiology, health and fitness, biomechanics, sport psychology, nutrition and human and growth development.

Supporting courses from biology, chemistry, physics, statistics are recommended to provide a more in-depth analysis of principles associated with human movement, structure and function and are pre-requisite courses for most post-baccalaureate programs. The following are professions the ESS in Pre-physical therapy and allied health will prepare you for:

  • Fitness Industries:
    • Personal Training
    • Corporate wellness
    • Health Club Manager
    • Nonprofit industry
    • Military
    • Biomedical research and/or sales
    • Nutrition specialists**
  • Outpatient and inpatient clinical care in:
    • Cardiac care and rehabilitation
    • Physical Therapy**
    • Occupational Therapy**
    • Nursing**
    • Medical Support Staff
    • Athletic Trainer**

**With post-baccalaureate studies -- You should explore the specific requirements at the school you plan to attend, as entrance requirements vary from school to school.

  • BS: Exercise and Sports Science Core Courses
  • 36 Units
  • BIO 246: Human Anatomy and Physiology I
  • 4

First of a two-semester sequence in human anatomy and physiology. Topics include the structure and function of cells, tissues, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Introduces common human disease processes. Emphasis is on interrelationships among systems and regulation of physiological functions involved in maintaining homeostasis. Laboratory component includes anatomical studies using microscopy and dissection and the study of physiological concepts via experimentation. Lab time is included in the schedule. A lab fee is required. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 111 or consent of instructor. Offered annually (fall semester).

  • BIO 247: Human Anatomy and Physiology II
  • 4

Second of a two-semester sequence in human anatomy and physiology. Topics include the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic/immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Introduces common human disease processes. Emphasis is on interrelationships among systems and regulation of physiological functions involved in maintain homeostasis. Laboratory component includes anatomical studies using microscopy and dissection and the study of physiological concepts via experimentation. Lab time is included in the schedule. A lab fee is required. Prerequisites: C- or better in BIO 111 and BIO 246 or consent of instructor. Offered anually (spring semester).

  • ESS 304: Motor Learning and Control
  • 3

This course will give an overview of significant factors which influence and determine the learning of motor skills including basic principles of learning theory and motor control as they apply to motor performance.

  • ESS 305: Motor Development
  • 3

This course will study motor skills and physical development from birth to adulthood with an emphasis on infancy, childhood, and adolescence including neurological, physiological, intellectual, social, and emotional factors that influence gross and fine movement activities.

  • ESS 320: Historical, Social, Cultural Foundations of Sport and P.E.
  • 3

This course will present and discuss the historical, sociological, and philosophical analyses of sport and physical education, including current challenges, relevant issues, controversies, and career opportunities in sport and physical education.

  • ESS 365: Sport Psychology
  • 3

The role of psychomotor and cognitive factors in human movement settings are discussed in this course along with selected topics of arousal, attribution theory, achievement motivation, anxiety, interventions, goal setting, attention styles, aggression, social facilitation, social reinforcement, and imagery.

  • ESS 403: Biomechanics
  • 4

This introductory course will look at the basic principles of anatomical mechanics and their applications to human movement including an analysis of efficient movement. Lab time is included in the schedule.

  • ESS 406: Physiology of Exercise
  • 4

This course applies the physiological principles to the study of human performance in exercise. A lab fee is required. Prerequisites: BIO 246 and BIO 247.

  • ESS 407: Kinesiology (Structural)
  • 4

This course will study human movement with an emphasis on the biomechanics, structure and function of the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. A lab fee is required. Prerequisite: BIO 246.

  • ESS 410: Measurement and Evaluation of Exercise
  • 4

The development, evaluation, and administration of tests in exercise science will be explored through lecture and practical settings in this course along with basic statistical analyses and its application in interpreting tests and measurements. A lab fee is required.

  • BS: Pre-Physical Therapy and Allied Health
  • 21 Units
  • ESS 308: Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries
  • 3

The theory and practice of the principles and techniques pertaining to the prevention and treatment of athletic injuries will be covered in this course along with the techniques of preventative athletic taping and strapping being incorporated into the laboratory component. A lab fee may be required. Prerequisite: Bio 246 or concurrent enrollment.

  • ESS 348: Recognizing and Evaluating Athletic Injuries I
  • 3

A theoretical and practical approach to injury assessment for the lower body, this course will use the systematic evaluation format, as governed by the National Athletic Trainers Association (NATA), is utilized with an emphasis placed on the evaluation of the lumbar spine, hip, thigh, knee, lower leg, ankle, foot, and gait analysis. Lab time is included in the schedule. Prerequisites: BIO 246, BIO 247, ESS 308, or consent of division chair.

  • ESS 349: Recognizing and Evaluating Athletic Injuries II
  • 3

A theoretical and practical approach to injury assessment for the upper body, this course will use the systematic evaluation format, as governed by the NATA, is utilized with an emphasis placed on the evaluation of the head/face, cervical/thoracic spine, shoulder, elbow, forearm, wrist, hand, and abdominal viscera. Lab time is included in the schedule. Prerequisites: BIO 246, BIO 247, ESS 308 or consent of division chair.

  • ESS 358: Therapeutic Exercise
  • 3

This course will present a theoretical and practical approach to therapeutic exercise and rehabilitation techniques for the injured athlete or those who engage in physical activity. Lab time is included in the schedule. Prerequisite: BIO 246, BIO 247, ESS 308, or consent of division chair.

  • ESS 368: Therapeutic Modalities
  • 3

A theoretical and practical approach for therapeutic modalities in exercise and rehabilitation are discussed and explored in this course. Lab time is included in the schedule. Prerequisite: BIO 246, ESS 308, or consent of division chair.

  • Choose two of the following courses:
  • ESS 306: Nutritional Sciences
  • 3

This course will explore issues pertinent to the study of health and nutrition for the active individual and will analyze concepts and controversies by illustrating the importance of research and clinical studies in the current nutritional literature. Students will also examine and discuss key concepts concerning the role of nutrition in overall health and well-being for a healthy lifestyle. Prerequisites: BIO 101 and sophomore standing.

  • ESS 307: Functional Exercise for the Older Adult
  • 3

This course will familiarize students with the effects of aging on the different physiological functions of the body and introduce fitness assessment and exercise prescription of aging. Chronic diseases associated with aging such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, diabetes mellitus, and arthritis will also be studied. A familiarity of body systems is necessary.

  • ESS 310: General Medicine and Pharmacology
  • 3

This course will incorporate the knowledge, skills, and values that entry-level certified athletic trainers or similar health professionals must possess to recognize, treat, and refer, when appropriate, general medical conditions and disabilities. Students will also look at the skills and knowledge of pharmacologic applications for athletes and others involved in physical activity. A class fee is required. Prerequisites: BIO 246, BIO 247 and ESS 308 or consent of division chair.

  • ESS 364: Exercise Psychology
  • 3

This course will focus on the psychological understanding of exercise behavior through the examination of both new psychological and social factors that influence physical activity participation and performance; how participating in physical activity and exercise affect psychological well-being; and the theoretical, methodological, and applied approaches to a variety of topics related to exercise.

  • ESS 395: Practicum: ESS Rehabilitation
  • 3

This course is a practical, hands-on experience outside the classroom directly related to the student's major, minor or professional program that is a beneficial complement to the student's academic experience.

Current students, please note: The requirements listed here may not reflect the most current courses for this major and may not be the requirements for the catalog year you are following to complete your major. Please refer to the Academic Catalog for official requirements you must meet to qualify for a degree.

Prerequisite courses for professional degrees (pre-physical therapy, pre-occupational therapy, cardiac rehabilitation, gerontology, pre-nursing, etc.) vary by institution. Depending on the doctoral program chosen BIO 111 and BIO 112, CHE 221 and CHE 222, and PHY 211 and PHY 212 may be included. Check with the department chair for additional information.


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